Gesture / Action Drawings

You will discover that this type of drawing is the complete opposite of contour drawing. Making the transition from contour line drawing to gesture drawing is very difficult as the process is completely different.  The key to gesture drawing is action not consistent line. In gesture drawing, you start with the whole form and work to define the parts.  Gesture drawings are sketched or scribbled with speed and bravado, and you must approach the process with abandonment. You are not drawing details; you are capturing the model's balance, weight distribution, and action.  Your line should be thin and thick to very broad strokes.

The idea of a gesture drawing is to capture the model's essential gesture, movement, volume, weight, and energy in the drawing.  The drawing should be bold and quickly drawn.  To achieve this you must draw from the shoulder and use your whole body.  This physical and energetic approach to drawing creates beautiful expressive drawings with elegant lines and gestures.

Drawing Assignment 1: Three large-scale drawings​ 

Three 5-minute gesture drawings of model (scribble), one on top of the other on the same paper.  Drawing these 5-minute drawings is like limbering up before you play a sport.  It is important to loosen up before starting a session of gesture drawings.

Materials: compressed charcoal sticks or chucks, 18 x 24 white newsprint paper
 

Drawing Assignment 2: Four large-scale drawings

Four 10-minute gesture drawings of the model on separate sheets of paper.

Materials: natural charcoal or Conte crayon, 18 x 24 drawing paper, chamois cloth for blending, erasers.

Drawing Assignment 3: Four large-scale drawings

Four 20-minute gesture drawings of the model on separate sheets of paper.
Materials: natural charcoal or Conte crayon, 18 x 24 drawing paper, chamois cloth for blending, erasers.

GestureDrawing-.jpg

Example: Two-minute gesture drawing of model (Scribble) one on top of the other on the same paper.